As a reader of this blog – you might know that I follow and agree with Dave Winer (who I do not know) .. a lot. In fact, a quick search on Beyond Bridges posts reveals 12 separate posts mentioning his name alone.

A couple of weeks ago he posted this on his blog, where he was celebrating the return of Robert Scoble to the world of blogging and RSS.

I had already been looking at this when Robert first announced it, commenting to him through Twitter that since I don’t use Facebook, I couldn’t comment on his blog. A short flurry of exchanges ensued, including being followed by the man himself. Honored, though I suspect that I might need to work hard to have him be a regular listener !
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But back to that post by Dave. I popped over to Twitter to share this with Dave – and lo – I discovered he had blocked me. Blocked mind you. Not muted, but blocked.

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In light of another one of his posts, I was a little surprised. He concluded his post thus:

I’d of course add my favorite (that doesn’t actually exist) — mute-with-timeout, which would allow me to turn off messages from people who might have a reason right now to be angry, but who I’d like to automatically give another chance to communicate with me, after having a chance to cool down.

This suggests that I had obviously done something really really bad.

Sorry Dave. Maybe I ‘@ called you’ a little too much on Twitter, maybe I said something that upset you. My mistake. Apologies. And don’t worry, no need to unblock me, I have other accounts if I really want to see what you are saying on Twitter, but I don’t. Most of my interest in your work lies on Scripting.com anyway, which I still receive through my RSS feed in Feedly – I just won’t @ Call you anymore, because that is the only reason I can come up with as to why I am blocked.

Yours
A Confused Fan

 

I found this an interesting read. Not for the headline;

Apple’s Cook is second most favorable tech CEO in poll of registered voters

… but rather for some of the comments in the body …

  • “About four out of 10 respondents (39 percent) said they view the Apple leader favorably. Most of the rest (44 percent) said they hadn’t heard of him or have no opinion.” (love to know the detail of that split.)
  • “12 percent said they hadn’t heard much about the Apple controversy, and another 12 percent said they’d heard nothing about it.
  • “when respondents saw some of Apple’s arguments laid out before them, they grew more likely to support the tech giant’s position in the debate.”

Bottom line – ask people who know nothing about a case what they think and you get the answer you would expect. George Orwell’s Groupthink comes to mind.

 

First published on Beyond Bridges on February 18th, 2016.

Updated February 19th, 2016
I read this today on Stowe's feed. I see a connection - how about you?

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The outer layers tend to innovate faster and so pull along, or be stabilised by, the lower, slower layers. At the boundaries you get constructive turbulence, say between Uber and governance, or how the growth in video streaming requires Internet infrastructure to come along with it.

[ Source : Stewart Brand via Stowe Boyd ]

My piece was not biased and I fear you misunderstand our business model. It is my editors’ steadfast refusal to consider the impact of stories on advertisers that makes us the decent newspaper we are. It is why I want to go on working here. It is why the FT goes on paying me.

An open letter to Henry Gomez, head of marketing and communications at Hewlett Packard Enterprise – in response to his rather ‘threatening’ letter to FT journalist Lucy Kellaway. Right On.

[ Source : Financial Times ]

First published on Beyond Bridges on February 10th, 2016.

Update : February 14th 2016.
Interestingly, a friend and reader of this blog just sent me this link, which is a third party version of the LinkedIN map below. It seems to be limited due to LinkedIN's API constraints, so it can't map more than 499 of your connections. That said, there does seem to be a lot more information and analysis that surrounds the graph. Andy it means YOU can go try it out on your network. Thank you David.

A good friend of mine messaged me through LinkedIN. He is a fast thinking, witty, bright, intelligent, big thinking kind of guy. He’s also interested in his next gig – so let me know if you want an introduction. Anyway, to my point. He had been on my LinkedIN profile and commented;

I think you would be well served to pare that list (of skills I had listed in my summary) to maybe 4-5 distinct and specialized areas where you really shine better than the rest. Things like Leadership, Marketing, Communications are too generic and readily available in the marketplace.

And I agreed. In fact, so much so that I pared it down to zero. My skill list is summarized in another part of the profile anyway. But it got me to thinking.


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