Ch Ch Ch Changes In Publishing

publishers smileA couple of months ago I wrote an extension to a piece by Ben Thompson at Stratchery. The original article clearly positions ‘content delivery’ at the low end of the value curve. Moreover, it is clear that though it was written from a specific point of view, you still can’t avoid the fact that as social, digital, mobile increasingly take hold, ‘delivery’ has been relegated to a ‘bit part’.

Corollary – if you believe that your business is ‘content delivery’ – I would suggest you stop – even step back for a minute – and think about the inevitability of a challenging business front.

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The Route to VRM and Customer Effective Demand Networks

If you are tracking, you will know that I have been talking about Customer Effective Demand Networks for a while. A long while actually. More recently I have been writing about VRM. That is ‘Vendor Relationship Management’, the flip side of CRM.

The CEDN aspect gets shortened to something that a lot of people call ‘Customer Centricity’, which as a result has become a platitude, a set of meaningless words. (¹)

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Unused Words

Unused WordsJust submitted a couple of articles to the big wide world – and these words ended up on the ‘cutting room floor’. Wanted to keep them for posterity. Pertinent.

For an organization to wonder who owns a process (even a process that is a misnomer) reflects on the never-ending problems that organizations have – the silos. Look into your own organization, your customers, your vendors – and ‘dollar to a donut’ you will quickly find teams where ‘social’, ‘web’, ’email’, ‘events’, ‘sales’, ‘support’, ‘accounts’ …. are teams in different groups – with different objectives, goals and even reporting lines.

No wonder our customers are confused.

Silos exist because the ‘command and control’ mentality remains strong in the enterprise. Until that is broken, customer centricity will remain at best a veneer and at worst – organizational death.

As for social sales – to me – it is the same as it ever was, barring the intermediate 100 years or so while the sales process has been industrialized. It is not new – it is what sales should be but we just lost our way. Just as we are discovering that industrializing our food chain was maybe not the best idea, or that applying manufacturing processes to our children’s education was ill conceived, so too we are needing to relearn that selling is about relationships and adding value.