Follow this link to an AMAZING post

The examples below are just three of a whole series of ads found on the net by the author … Chris Barton, a photographer and the managing director of Photographers Direct, a professional photography portal and ‘Fair Trade Photography’ pioneer.

Spot any similarities ? There are many. my first reaction s was surely not – this is all made up. I can’t vouch fro them all  but I did some random look ups for 5 minutes – all there. What’s even more amazing if you think about it is that Chris wrote this piece over two months ago.

Not only are they not very original – but goodness they are either lazy OR are not clued enough to track this kind of commentary on the web.

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I’m so glad I am not the only one tapping out this tune …. Blake Discher’s blog is chock full of some superb nuggets. This but one of them.

 

“Even in these stressful economic times, your business will be more successful if you are willing to recognize one fact: you need to be a salesperson first, and a photographer second. Many photographers take great photographs, but far fewer excel at sales. When I speak to audiences about negotiating, I%u2019m always quick to point out that sales skills are what help you to demonstrate to the client why they should hire you instead of your competitor.”

and

“Sell your value, not your product”

Linking back to Blake Discher’s Groozi.com – full story here :You Need to be a Salesperson First

Ever since I was sent this NYT article: For Photographers, the Image of a Shrinking Path – NYTimes.com, I had been mulling this in my mind. Before that even. I picked up on one set of words … which I replay here to save you clicking through.

Full disclosure – I am not – nor would I ever pretend to be a photographer, fine-artist, musician, write, sculptor or any other kind of creative professional ….. I am however someone who admires the work of a number of photographers, fine-artists, musicians, writers, sculptors and other kinds of creative professionals – and I currently happen to be working in a space that provides an aspect of business savvy to those photographers, fine-artists, musicians, writers, sculptors and other kinds of creative professionals.

“There are very few professional photographers who, right now, are not hurting, said Holly Stuart Hughes, editor of the magazine Photo District News.

That has left professional photographers with a bit of an identity crisis. Nine years ago, when Livia Corona was fresh out of art school, she got assignments from magazines like Travel and Leisure and Time. Then, she said, three forces coincided.

They were the advertising downturn, the popularity and accessibility of digital photography, and changes in the stock-photo market.

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